As we witness the world around us, it's the tropical storm Falcon, coupled with the prevailing southwest monsoon, that is leaving a mark, unleashing torrential rains over the western sections of Luzon and Visayas. Falcon, the sixth storm to sweep the Philippines this year, is presently positioned 1,360 kilometers east of Central Luzon, making its steady advance at a pace of 15 kilometers per hour.


Unraveling Tropical Storm Falcon And Its Impact On Luzon And Visayas.
Image: PAGASA


The Mighty Force of Falcon

Falcon whirls with maximum sustained winds of 65 kilometers per hour near its center, and it possesses the capacity to gust up to a staggering 80 kilometers per hour. Its course remains directed towards the west-northwest, bringing along a surge of powerful winds and heavy rainfall that magnify the strength of the southwest monsoon, locally referred to as 'habagat'.


While Falcon might not appear to be a significant threat on its own, its power lies in its ability to amplify the effects of the southwest monsoon. The gusty conditions that Falcon contributes to will remain prevalent in certain regions, extending from Zambales, Bataan, Palawan, Occidental Mindoro, and Romblon, reaching out to most of Calabarzon, the Bicol Region, and Western Visayas.


The Enhanced Habagat: A Persistent Phenomenon

The habagat, strengthened by the combined forces of Falcon and tropical storm Egay, has been relentless. Continuous rains have been persisting in the western part of the country, Southern Luzon, and Western Visayas, owing to Falcon's enhancing effects on the monsoon.


This precipitation does not simply cease at dampening spirits; it brings along potential hazards, notably in elevated or mountainous areas. Flooding and landslides are becoming an ever-increasing risk, especially in areas that have previously been marked out on hazard maps as being highly susceptible to such natural disasters.


Bracing For Impact: An Advisory For Vigilance

The Office of Civil Defense urges citizens to remain watchful as Falcon fuels the monsoon. PAGASA, the country's weather bureau, has also sounded a warning, cautioning residents of possible flooding and landslides, especially in areas prone to such hazards or regions that have experienced recent heavy rainfall.


While we cannot prevent the wrath of nature, our understanding and preparedness for these events are key. As we brace ourselves for the ongoing onslaught of rain, Falcon serves as a reminder of the significant power and unexpected outcomes brought forth by these atmospheric phenomena.

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